Everest was measured manually

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It took twelve men to move the instruments which the British used to measure India and the Himalayas.
It took twelve men to move the instruments which the British used to measure India and the Himalayas.

SCIENCE HISTORY: In the 1800s, the British decided itself to measure and map the entire India.

In the 1800s you could across India observe strange activities: groups of men in thick uniforms sweaty dragged enormous instruments of rivers and hills and steep mountain sides. The instruments were theodolites, weighing half a ton. They were used for measuring horizontal and vertical angles, and such there were a lot of, the British had decided to measure and map the whole of India from north to south.

The surveyors also struggled up the lower slopes of the Himalayas to measure the height of the earth’s highest mountain range.
Initially, they concentrated particularly on Kanchenjunga, which they considered to be the world’s highest. Behind this mountain inhabited and another peak, as the British first named Peak B.

Only after several years of soundings, it became clear in 1852 that the Kanchenjunga with its 8598 meters was a giant. We now know that it is the world’s third highest after Everest and K2 – but Peak B was actually even higher. According teodolitm√§tningarna stretched itself throughout 8839.8 meters in the air. Just over ten years later, in 1865, got the rock its current name. It was named after George Everest, who led the British projekt.

In the 1950s, Everest’s height adjusted up to 8848 meters, and since then the mountain has grown another two meters. With data from GPS equipment positioned on the top of Everest could an American expedition in 1999 stating that Mount Everest is 8850 meters high.

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